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Project Nissan 370Z- Suspension Basics
By Mike Kojima


In the first segment of Project 370Z we worked with AEM to evaluate the awesome ETI cold air intake.  Since our car is going to be focused on streetable track performance, we next turned our attention to the suspension.  The first and most critical parts of any track worthy suspension build are the swaybars, dampers and springs.

 
The Whiteline front bar (part number BNF41Z) has precise bends, a durable powdercoated finish, billet aluminum bar locks and low compliance urethane bushings.
The rear bar (part number BNR37Z) has clamp on urethane bar locks and hard urethane bushings.

We decided to use Whiteline adjustable antisway bars for project 370Z.  We are strong believers that swaybars for a street/track car have to be adjustable.  Conditions change from street to track and from track to track.  Your wheel tire stagger and combo are probably different from what your coilovers were developed on.  Your driving style is most likely different than that of the drivers/engineers that developed your suspension calibration.  Having adjustment in your roll stiffness via the bars can really help you dial in your car. 

The front Whiteline bar is the same diameter as stock but solid instead of hollow like the stock bar.  It is two way adjustable.  The rear bar is 1mm larger than stock and is three way adjustable.

The Whiteline bars are really high quality; with an excellent fit and a glossy rust resistant powdercoated finish.  Unlike other aftermarket bars, we don’t have to worry about bind and interference with other chassis parts with the well-designed Whiteline parts.  The Whiteline bars pivot on hard polyurethane bushings to reduce compliance over the stock soft rubber, making the bars more effective.

 
The rear bar uses Whiteline's heavy duty adjustable end links.  The adjustment allows you to remove all preload from the bars, important when corner weighting.  It also allows you to adjust the length to minimize angularity when adjusting the bar in different holes.

The Whiteline bars are two-way adjustable in the front and 3-way adjustable in the rear.  The front bar is two-way adjustable due to the short length of the stock end links.  Having more adjustment would risk bind due to the excessive angularity of the short link in the tight space.  The rear bar uses Whiteline’s heavy duty adjustable end links.  These end links are much stronger than stock and are adjustable to eliminate preload and to get the most favorable angularity when adjusting the bars.

 
We had to drop the exhaust to wiggle the rear bar in place.

 

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Comments
EB Turbo
EB Turbolink
Monday, February 27, 2012 5:52 AM
With aftermarket suspension (with and without shock body length adjustments) do you reset bumpstop length?

EB Turbo
Der Bruce
Der Brucelink
Monday, February 27, 2012 12:16 PM
And you showed how to give us phenomenal handling from a little hard work in our driveways!
R. Motoki
R. Motokilink
Monday, February 27, 2012 1:30 PM
Last pic on page 4 has a sneak peek on those susp. arms huh? :P
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 27, 2012 2:46 PM
EB, sometimes you play with bump stops.
warmmilk
warmmilklink
Monday, February 27, 2012 2:50 PM
No love for the powergrid end links on the front sway?
EB Turbo
EB Turbolink
Monday, February 27, 2012 3:29 PM
Not play with bump stop rate. I mean set the position. All proper shocks are designed to work with a specific bumpstop height and tire diameter. If you pull the sprig off of the shock, jack from the lower control arm(so the tire is free to spin), and see what contacts first. If the tire lifts the car and is not able to spin your bumpstop is too short and ineffective. If the bumpstop compresses and lifts the car the wheel should have a very slight drag. If it spins freely depending on how much travel is left before the tire contacts the frame, that is unused and wasted travel. The bumpstop height should be adjusted by triming or adding whims to make sure the bumpstop is working effectively and efficiently.
Clint Boisdeau
Clint Boisdeaulink
Monday, February 27, 2012 3:40 PM
warmmilk, the front endlinks are the OEM 370z units

EB turbo, the bumpstop is off effective length to protect the damper from over compression, and in regards to proper on track compression travel, this will be tested and documented
EB Turbo
EB Turbolink
Monday, February 27, 2012 4:26 PM
Then they should make the the shaft shorter to not even have that problem in the first place.
Clint Boisdeau
Clint Boisdeaulink
Monday, February 27, 2012 4:31 PM
the damper shaft i feel is of proper length and i also am confident we will not have travel issues on track
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 27, 2012 4:36 PM
EB, If you know the answer then why are you asking the question? Just curious. Maybe I didn't understand your question.

I assure you that the KW's are properly engineered and the bump travel is the most that can be allowed. It has to be for TUV compliance.
EB Turbo
EB Turbolink
Monday, February 27, 2012 6:15 PM
I was asking if your normally travel the suspension to set the bumpstop. I am not doubting the engineering of the KWs. Clint made the comment that I responded to about shaft length. These KWs are designed for the 370 with stock wheels? If so any other tire diameter will change the the bumpstop height. Mike, I am just curious on your practices...
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 27, 2012 6:46 PM
For a streetcar without the adjustable body length? I just put it on and run it but not too low. For adjustable body length I do what you were talking about.
Clint Boisdeau
Clint Boisdeaulink
Monday, February 27, 2012 7:23 PM
as we know i wont be running the car close to "too low" as to keep the roll center behavior and travel optimum
M.Bonanni
M.Bonannilink
Wednesday, February 29, 2012 5:39 AM
Those Whiteline sways are the stuff. LOVE them on my 370Z.
bru1212
bru1212link
Sunday, March 04, 2012 5:34 PM
Good stuff ! I picked up a set of these(actually RCE tarmac2) for a good deal and am waiting on weather to install. Its nice to read more indepth on these as opposed too my car specific forum(subaru) where people just say doooood get them ! BTW just joined and am eager to learn. Thumbs up motoiq
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