Project Cars

Evaluating the ACT Heavy Duty Clutch and XACT Prolite Flywheel for the Honda S2000

by Mike Kojima

Vince, our FNG, drives a Honda S2000 that serves as his daily driver.  The S2K takes him to work and school day in and day out.  However the Honda also serves as a track day vehicle seeing duty at Willow Springs, Buttonwillow and Cal Speedway.  After serving reliably for 80,000 miles the clutch suddenly went out on Vince on his way to work.


 

"My Girlfriend's" Miata: Brake Upgrade with Good-Win-Racing and DBA USA

by Daniel O'Donnell

We’re doing it people. The impossible is becoming possible. We’re taking a car that I don’t own or insure and slowly turning it into a track vehicle that is someone else’s day-to-day responsibility. That being said, in order to keep up this ruse, I can’t screw up its daily manners too much or the girlfriend might catch on to my plan. This was a big concern for me when I was planning one of the most important systems for the track, the brakes!


 

Project Isuzu VehiCross Part 7: Getting Hitched With Curt Manufacturing

by David Zipf

One of the reasons we bought a VehiCross, on top of its coolness, was the ability to tow another car.  See, the VehiCross is not my only car.  I have two others that are both in various states of disrepair and both are in Delaware, where I was born and raised.  Currently, my two real projects are 650 miles from where I make my home in Kentucky and if I ever intend to drive these toys again I will need to get them here and get to wrenching.  Now, we could hire a delivery service to pick up the cars and drag them down here, but that’s a) very expensive, and b) difficult since, while both cars start, they barely run.  So we decided to do the towing ourselves.  First we installed a hitch, then we hooked up a car.


 

Polishing Project STurdteen with KBD Body Kits - Part 1

by Rathyna Gomer

A few years ago, this ridiculous trend swept the drifting community after the introduction of what us drifters call a “missile car”. During a track day a few months ago I was doing some tandem runs in my missile car and ended up getting hit after I spun out and went off course by the follow car. 

If I hadn’t already proved it to you after Part 1, drifters destroy everything – side skirts, fenders, doors, bumpers, and more. Unlike other forms of racing, it isn’t necessarily about the lightest, most aerodynamic parts – it’s about the most durable parts! For that reason, I decided to go with KBD Body Kits, owned by parent company American Plastic Technologies. 


 

Project Evo X GSR: Completing the Suspension with Whiteline

by Mike Kojima

It's been a long time between updates on Project Evo X GSR.  It hasn't been for lack of trying, the car has been through a couple of different owners and it's been hard to catch up with it.  Well we have caught up with it at last and it's time for some long awaited parts to go in.

It's a good thing too, Whiteline has come out with some new parts for the Evo X in the meanwhile.  When the project was more active, the only parts available were swaybars but since then they have come out with a roll center and bump steer correction kit, a kit to reduce front lift and add positive caster, an adjustable camber link and a full bushing set. 


 

Plastic is Fantastic:  Part 6 – Assembling the Beast

by Jonathan Spiegel

As usual, racecars rarely get finished on schedule when you’ve got a day job, but that hasn’t stopped us from burning up weekends (and a little midnight oil on weeknights as well). When we last looked at the Polystrand CRX GT-Lite car, we had just finished creating the new rear framework for the trick IRS assembly. For those of you who haven’t been following the project so far, you can click here to catch up on the first 5 installments of this crazy journey. Without much fanfare, we’re going to jump right back in, since we’ve made a lot of progress since then.


 

Project Viper GTS: Part 6 - Corsa Exhaust and Kooks HFC

Project VIPER GTS: Part 6 - Corsa Performance Exhaust and Kooks Green Cats

by Billy Johnson

After some impressive gains from intake work in Part 4, we now turn our attention to the opposite side of the engine to improve the evacuation of exhaust gasses as well as reduce the cabin temperature of our notoriously hot viper.  For as outlandish and attention grabbing the Viper’s style was, the exhaust note did not have the same head-turning appeal.  To remedy this we reached out to our friends at Corsa Performance for their 3” cat-back exhaust to give our viper a more sporty and refined tone.  To further boost the volume and greatly knock down the calf-burning side sill heat, we installed a pair of compact Kooks Green Cats which are both environmentally and power friendly. 


 

Project E46 M3: Part 12 – Whiteline Front Control Arm Lower Inner Rear Bushing, Alignment, and Tumbler Switch fix

by Pablo Mazlumian

It’s hard to believe that nearly an entire year has gone by since we’ve last updated Project E46 M3. The car's been running great, and the 320-plus WHP normally-aspirated S54 six-cylinder never ceases to amaze. This time we enlisted Whiteline for its drop-in, lower inner rear bushings for the front control arms, and performed a quick fix to the steering column. We also got an alignment at a very unassuming shop with interesting machines inside! Take a look.


 

Project Supra: Part 14 – Precision Turbo's GEN2 PT6870 CEA Turbocharger

by Pablo Mazlumian

Since the recent wintery weather hasn’t allowed this Midwest import to have much fun, we've been rather quiet with regard to Project Supra. But the weather's breaking, and so will traction--thanks to the GEN2 PT6870 CEA turbo madness from Precision Turbo! Check it out...


 

Project E36 M3: Part 6 - Short Shifter and Engine Mounts

Project E36 M3: Part 6 - Short Shifter and Engine Mounts

by Jonathan Lawson

After reading the glowing magazine reviews for two and half years in the mid-90s, I finally test drove my first BMW E36 M3 back in 1997. That drive was all I could think about until July of 1999 when I finally gave in and bought my first M3. I was coming from a 1994 DC4 Acura Integra LS, so everything about the E36 M3 was incredible to me… Except the shifter. The first thing I remember from that very first test drive was the feeling of churning butter just to shift gears. The overall feel was acceptable, but the length of the throws was ridiculous compared to the notchy goodness of the Acura, so that was the first thing I changed on my original ’99 M3, and it’s the first thing I’ve changed on each E36 I’ve owned since then.


 

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