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Preparing for Endurance: Racing at the Rolex 24 at Daytona with a Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Preparing for Endurance: Racing at the Rolex 24 at Daytona with a Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

By Efrain Olivares

Magnus Racing is a second year team that has quickly made an impact in endurance racing in North America. The team, which will compete in the GRAND-AM Rolex Sports Car Series and the American Le Mans Series, achieved a number of standout performances throughout its rookie season last year.Preparing for Endurance: Racing at the Rolex 24 at Daytona with a Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

The team’s engineer, Lars Giersing, has engineered four teams to four GRAND-AM Rolex Sports Car Series titles in his career. Teamed with crew chief John Bedell, the two are in charge of preparation on the No. 44 Magnus Racing Porsche 911 GT3 Cup which is carried out by an experienced crew of sports car and Porsche experts. The accumulated years of experience mean that they know how to prepare a Porsche to withstand the punishment of 24 hours of racing.Preparing for Endurance: Racing at the Rolex 24 at Daytona with a Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

For a long distance race, such as the 24 Hours of Daytona, the 12 Hours of Sebring, or the 10-hour Petit Le Mans, the team’s Porsche 911 GT3 Cup is taken completely apart with every component inspected. The list of brand new items installed is extensive, including engine and gearbox (with new gears and a new ring and pinion), radiators and hoses, uprights, axles, clutch, brakes, fuel pumps, and a long list of smaller items. In fact, at this year’s Daytona 24 Hours, the team replaced the engine and rebuilt the gearbox after qualifying and before the race started.Preparing for Endurance: Racing at the Rolex 24 at Daytona with a Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

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Comments
BenFenner
BenFennerlink
Monday, February 14, 2011 8:31 AM
I thought all modern 911s had equal sized rotors/calipers front to back (because hard braking causes a 50/50 weight distribution on the tires).
I guess that is not the case here due to weight distribution differences, or available traction.
Dusty Duster
Dusty Dusterlink
Monday, February 14, 2011 8:47 AM
The pictures showing the pit stop are fascinating. How much practice does the pit crew need to work that fast and flawlessly?
8695Beaters
8695Beaterslink
Monday, February 14, 2011 9:36 AM
I have a feeling that due to the changing fuel loads and aerodynamic work, the racing 911s have different weight distribution under braking.

This year's Daytona race was very good and fun to watch. Hope MotoIQ gets to go inside on of these cars I'd like to see what needs to be done to make these cars last 24 hours balls out.
Daewoo Of Death
Daewoo Of Deathlink
Monday, February 14, 2011 10:07 PM
I'm surprised they had to change so much. The GT3RS is a seriously tough, well built car out of the box. Evo, I think, ran one at the Nurburgring 24hours with nothing but a roll cage, slicks and coilovers and finished very well.
JDMized
JDMizedlink
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 12:19 AM
Great article. Thanks for sharing.
Marc
Marclink
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 5:18 AM
Evo, I think, ran one at the Nurburgring 24hours with nothing but a roll cage, slicks and coilovers and finished very well....

not evo.. porsche :) they drove the car on his own wheels too the ring finished 13th (i thnik) and then drove back home :)
spdracerut
spdracerutlink
Tuesday, February 15, 2011 10:49 PM
I think Daewoo meant Evo magazine ran a GT3?

Daewoo, I'm guessing the reason they change everything is to maximize their reliability for the race. Parts only last a certain amount of time, so if you want to minimze the chance of anything breaking during the race, install new parts. Winning ain't cheap :)
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