25

The JE piston rings are still in amazingly good shape. Note how blow-by staining on the piston skirt is non-existent, and the second compression ring has almost no wear. With a long stroke and high revs, non-WPC treated ring wear is usually severe, and it is very difficult to get a ring to hold compression for this long. Like I mentioned before, the engine had excellent compression and leakdown numbers when pulled. The piston wrist pins and piston pin boss were WPC treated and showed no visible wear at all. 
 

The Crower mechanical roller cam has essentially no wear at all. The WPC treated areas show some light burnishing, but no measurable change in dimensions. The cam could easily be stuck right back in for another year of use. This is pretty amazing because it is a pretty radical cam with fast lobes and a high installed seat pressure. These sort of cams wear faster than mild streetable cams.
 

A close-up view of the cam lobes. We are just going to re-WPC treat it and stick it right back in!
 

We WPC treated the cylinder bores with good results. You can still see the honing marks on the block cylinders' heavily loaded thrust side! This is amazingly low wear for a long stroke engine that sees up to 7700 rpm. 

The bores could be honed and reused but we are choosing to rebore by 0.005" for a complete bore cleanup. At this rate, we will get many years of service out of this block. 

The wear of the bore and pistons is very low considering that the engine is run on ethanol. Ethanol has very low lubricity compared to gasoline and a strong solvent effect that removes oil from cylinder walls, reducing lubrication between the piston and cylinder. Most ethanol or methanol engines exhibit shorter service life for these reasons. Thanks to WPC, we still have an excellent life for these areas!

 

OHV engines put a lot of side load on valve stems which accelerate both stem and valve guide wear. A fast-acting roller cam makes this much worse. Ethanol fuel does as well. 

Our engine's valves have been WPC treated and have little wear on the stems. The valves are still plenty good, but we change them for preventative maintenance reasons. Our super expensive engines built by the other guys had frequent valvetrain failures, but we have not. 

We also WPC treated the valve springs to help improve the fatigue life. Previously, we would have to change the valve springs every 4-5 events or suffer from breakage and risk dropping a valve.  Now we can run 10 plus events without an issue. 

 

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Comments
chewymilk98
chewymilk98link
Monday, February 26, 2018 9:30 AM
Mike. There's actually something I wanted to thank you, and the Sport Compact Car people for. Many years ago a plastic manufacturing plant I worked at, was having a problem with the process. Without getting too in detail. They had a problem with the plastic flow sticking to the larger tooling. Conventional wisdom was micro polishing the tooling. It worked great for the smaller tooling. But on the larger tooling, it only made it worse. My suggestion was instead of polishing the surface, we should media blast it. Plastic by nature off gasses. It really off gasses when heated to a viscous. If the tooling had a slightly rough surface I believed the gasses would fill in the voids (a thing I later learned was called a boundary layer) and the plastic would "flow" over it easier. And therefor not stick.
Then I read an article in SCC (I think it was a Nissan SER build off. You made an expensive car. The pretty boy made a cheap on) But one of you have the transmission WPC treated.
I researched it a little, and found a local place that did this to aviation wheel bearings. Had the tooling WPCed, and it worked excellent.

Thanks for sharing all this information. It helps us a lot. And it really helped further my career.

Also. Holy S%$T that cam and crank look amazing, after the beating they took.
VP
VPlink
Monday, February 26, 2018 10:59 AM
I'm completely sold to it from what I've seen/read... But where can this be done in Europe?!
Shipping part half around the world is expensive not to mention the customs playing a part on turn around time.

Thanks in advance.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 26, 2018 1:01 PM
Chewymilk98, wow that is an interesting application of the process. I have used it with gun parts before to increase reliability with a lot of success before. I have also used it for small displacement two and 4 stroke engines with good results.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 26, 2018 1:02 PM
VP let me see if I can find out if it can be done in Europe.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 26, 2018 1:58 PM
VP Currently WPC is only being done here in the US and in Japan.
Matt L. Adkins
Matt L. Adkinslink
Monday, February 26, 2018 2:05 PM
Mike Kojima- What would you recommend WPC treatment for in a bare minimum/most vital parts application. I have a DC5 that I drive hard/autocross and want to get the best bang for buck on my rebuild. I'm doing a full tear down of the engine and trans to replace any worn parts. I have a couple bad syncros and the valve train aren't looking so good after 180,000 miles.
VP
VPlink
Monday, February 26, 2018 2:41 PM
Thanks for the feedback Mike! Shame... :(
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 26, 2018 2:56 PM
Matt, Anytime wear, friction reduction or fatigue resistance is important WPC is a good bang for the buck.
Bba
Bba link
Monday, February 26, 2018 6:12 PM
Mike..Izumi and I talked about also incorporating Cryo (he very much believes the process) with the WPC for his customers..Would you consider using this?
MikeGTR
MikeGTRlink
Monday, February 26, 2018 6:16 PM
Hey Mike,

Is there any way to get this brought over to Australia?

We would have a huge market and it seems crazy that it still can't be done here.


Thanks,

Mike
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 26, 2018 6:23 PM
MikeGTR, currently there are no plans but I think they may license it out.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 26, 2018 6:24 PM
Bba, Cyro would work well with WPC but Cryo doesn't work with an aluminum block, the liners crack.
Bba
Bba link
Monday, February 26, 2018 6:45 PM
I dont know where the Cryo was done..But we've done quite a bit of Aluminum blocks, liners, pistons etc..and have seen very solid results, including plastic molds for the plastic industry...Would love to help prove the tech if you would allow us a chance..
Bba
Bba link
Monday, February 26, 2018 6:46 PM
Can work with Izumi to make it simple
warmmilk
warmmilklink
Monday, February 26, 2018 7:58 PM
did you guys WPC the cylinder bores too?
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 26, 2018 9:00 PM
Warmmilk, yes, was it not clear in the story? Maybe I have to edit.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Monday, February 26, 2018 9:04 PM
Bba, when I have tried to Cryo aluminum blocks the liners cracked, where is your company, you must have a better process and we would like to work with you.
Bba
Bba link
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 6:32 AM
OK Great.. we are located in Van Nuys...I'll contact you on FB by PM
chewymilk98
chewymilk98link
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 7:38 AM
I've used it for metal guns also (as in non polymer). But I've used it for many industrial applications. Linear bearing rails, Tie-bars, Flights and lands, etc.

I'm trying to nurse one of my motorcycles to 100K (it's at 89K now) If the engine is serviceable, it's getting as much wpc as I can. And maybe a light pressure turbo.

A question. Should I have the rings treated. Or just the cylinders and pistons. If I do the turbo, I'm worried about the rings seating. Or blow by. Etc.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 11:16 AM
I do the rings on my motors. It takes them a little longer to seat but they wear forever.
warmmilk
warmmilklink
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 11:36 AM
@Mike, might be a little bit my reading comprehension and trying to sneak read the article while working :D
Tarik Laaraj
Tarik Laarajlink
Saturday, May 19, 2018 6:43 PM
Wpc a turbo?
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