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Fredric The Great, a Look Inside the Papadakis Racing Scion tC of Fredric Aasbo

Fredric The Great, a Look Inside the Papadakis Racing Scion tC of Fredric Aasbo
By Mike Kojima

We had never heard of Norwegian Fredric Aasbo before Formula D's Long Beach Round last year.  Suddenly out of nowhere a red privateer Toyota Supra driven by a guy whose last name we could not pronounce almost stood on the podium bettering the efforts of many seasoned and well backed Formula D veterans.

Fredric The Great, a Look Inside the Papadakis Racing Scion tC of Fredric Aasbo
The battle of Fredric vs Dai Yoshihara at Road Atlanta was classic.  Big Chevy LS V8 vs turbocharged Toyota 4 cylinder.

With precise car control and a spectacular high angle driving style Fredric burst on to the American pro drifting scene.  Later we learned that he came from a rally background and was also the 2008 Nordic drifting champion.  With his self funded privateer program, Fredric and his Supra with a nearly stock 2JZ became a fan favorite, becoming the guy who the lovers of underdogs cheer for.  The guy from Ski Norway took the hurt to the top factory teams several times during the 2010 season and got the attention of everyone including the media, drift fans and some major corporations.

Fredric The Great, a Look Inside the Papadakis Racing Scion tC of Fredric Aasbo
Fredric's car was fast, surprising Dai and his team forcing Dai to drive 100%.

If you meet Fredric, he is a super cool and humble guy who surprisingly speaks fluent American English with very little accent.  We asked him how he learned English so well and he told us it was from watching Baywatch on TV as a kid!

Fredric The Great, a Look Inside the Papadakis Racing Scion tC of Fredric Aasbo
Fredric dropped a wheel in the dirt which probably resulted in a points deduction costing him a one more time and allowing Dai to advance.  Still this run showed that Fredric and the Scion are a force to be reckoned with.

 Fredric The Great, a Look Inside the Papadakis Racing Scion tC of Fredric Aasbo



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Comments
JDMized
JDMizedlink
Wednesday, June 08, 2011 8:50 PM
Thanks for sharing Mike, great article as usual. Those ports ARE big. A big up goes to Papadakis as well for sticking with the OE engine.
DavidR1611
DavidR1611link
Wednesday, June 08, 2011 9:09 PM
Is Fredric's Scion using an electric throttle based on how it looks to be?
DavidR1611
DavidR1611link
Wednesday, June 08, 2011 9:19 PM
how much is the difference of its wheelbase to the Supra as well?
JDMized
JDMizedlink
Wednesday, June 08, 2011 9:21 PM
Those upper camber adjustable links look like Skunk2 pieces for the 9th generation Honda Civic....haha
MxExUx
MxExUxlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 12:54 AM
Hey Mike,
You said that they might be using longer rods to improve stroke/rod ratio and reduce piston speed; can you please explain. I was under the impression that stroke/rod ratio was mostly for improving piston side loading. I also thought that piston speed could only be changed when stroke length is changed.

...Please teach Sensei.

Very cool article BTW. I love these inside looks into purpose built cars!!
SWR
SWRlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 2:39 AM
A few things... "Flow Balance"... Please say they are not using the "norm" of 75% exhaust to intake ratio from the flowbench. Still. Please...

Also...adding quench? Usually you remove quench for boosted app's and add to the CR instead so it doesn't drop too far, you don't want loads of squish in a boosted app, period...

Thank God you said "shorter IC piping reduce lag due to less volume" and not "Smaller IC piping reduce lag due to less internal volume"...
Dusty Duster
Dusty Dusterlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 4:02 AM
What's the advantage of putting the front sway bar above the engine?
jeffball610
jeffball610link
Thursday, June 09, 2011 4:05 AM
Quench, as I understand it, simply puts all the air and fuel in the middle of the combustion chamber for combustion. Look at any diesel motor's pistons. Also, running E85 makes a lot of things different. I know of people running 11:1 compression on boosted E85 cars due to its great heat dissipation and anti-knock qualities. I also know of someone trying to run 13:1, but we'll see what happens.
And those exhaust ports look really small to me, especially in comparison to those ENORMOUS intake ports. And looking at the gauges, either the "stock" cams are running with lots of overlap, or they are really bumpy due to the low vacuum showing on the gauge.
jeffball610
jeffball610link
Thursday, June 09, 2011 4:06 AM
p.s. What's up with the red tape? Is it marking something they need to work on or worked on like marking bolts you've torqued?
SWR
SWRlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 5:25 AM
Jeffball610, yes it does, but the denser the mass the faster the Squish Velocity. As soon as you start putting a greater mass in the chamber the velocity goes up, and as soon as it gets too high it starts being detrimental to detonation resistance. Diesels run on controlled detonation, so they want it to go bang. Apples and oranges.

And the exhaust ports... the hotter it runs the smaller it can proportionally be, to a certain point. No high-performance engine around run 75% flow balance anymore. I'm just worried that exhaust port job hurt the spool more than it gained it. 13:1 CR on E85 will be no problem, as long as you can ignite it, it takes some serious spark. And compression ratios don't say much anyway.

When I did Fredric's Euro Supra engine he got (additional) huge response on a change to higher-CR, less-quench pistons.. so I would not bet my life on the notion that big squish on a booster is good, as my experience says otherwise. Unless Stephan just used those pistons to add to an already too-low CR.

I would bet he runs lots of overlap.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 6:18 AM
I disagree about squish hurting detonation resistance on forced induction applications. Its a Tuner thing based on what some drag racers are saying. When studying combustion using advanced simulation and actual quantitative measurement, having a good chamber design and squish reduces detonation.

I run squish on all of my engines and even increse it when practical depending on the combustion chamber. bore size and valve configuration.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 6:25 AM
David, thats not a drive by wire throttle, you are looking at the TPS. I think its a GM aftermarket throttle body.

Mr Ex A long rod reduces piston acceleration away from TDC which helps energy transference to the piston, gives more time to fill the cylinder, helping VE at higher rpm and reduces stress on reciprocating parts as well as like you said, reduces side load.

Dusty, having the front swaybar up there makes it easy to adjust our change.

Jeffballs, the cam timing is variable on both the intake and exhaust so there is a lot of control of overlap. I dunno what they were doing with the red tape.

SWR
SWRlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 6:36 AM
Mike, don't get me wrong, I'm not saying any squish is hurting detonation resistance. I'm saying too much squish area at the wrong place in the chamber CAN be detrimental to detonation resistance. Should have been clearer on that, sorry.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 6:41 AM
For sure I agree on that.
spdracerut
spdracerutlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 6:47 AM
With the cooler EGTs from running E85, the aluminum exhaust makes sense as it's very light weight and the EGTs are low enough where the aluminum won't melt.
Der Bruce
Der Brucelink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 8:09 AM
I'm split on the Scions. I love their ingenuity, look and approach BUT find them wildly more controversial than any of our V8 debates.

So are they using the exhaust tunnel for the driveline? I was really hoping to see a little more of the rear subframe and how they're doing the RWD conversion. Maybe even how they fit the tranny in there without tearing out the firewall. I keep thinking how crazy it would be if someone was making conversion kits for these.

Thanks for getting this stuff Mike, great inside look!
Jeff Naeyaert
Jeff Naeyaertlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 9:13 AM
The red tape is to see where the tires might be rubbing during a run... you can get a better idea of it in this pic: HERE and HERE
Der Bruce
Der Brucelink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 10:04 AM
Nice pics Jeff. Smart way to check clearance.
Rockwood
Rockwoodlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 10:07 AM
Damn you Jeff, beat me to it.

I'm surprised they didn't go with a QC rear end like a lot of the LS(x) cars have. You get better driveline angles with the narrower diff, and the easily changed ratios would be nice. From what I've seen, the Supra diffs aren't cheap either.

On those EFR turbos, how's the wastegate and turbine flow merge look? Hard to tell in the pictures. Does the BOV recirculate, or just atmosphere?
Rockwood
Rockwoodlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 10:10 AM
Khiem: in regards to aluminum, is any turbo car going to have exhaust hot enough to melt Al after the downpipe anyway?
Jeff Naeyaert
Jeff Naeyaertlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 11:09 AM
@Rockwood: ha! surprised you didn't find the answer to your own question then on the wastegate/turbone flow: HERE

...and there is no BOV. See first pic on page 5
spdracerut
spdracerutlink
Thursday, June 09, 2011 11:46 AM
Steve... I guess we can just say, the aluminum exhaust will hold up better with E85 than unleaded race gas. The runs are relatively short duration too making it more feasible.
mxpop
mxpoplink
Friday, June 10, 2011 6:20 AM
Longer rods = + piston dwell
SS DP and then changes to AL so less heat at that point
There is a BOV, it's integrated into turbo
Ockham
Ockhamlink
Friday, June 10, 2011 4:04 PM
I can't see a drag-inspired aluminum rod for this application. I wonder if those special rods are custom titanium pieces? Maybe an aero-profiled cross section? Cosworth-derived asymmetric wrist pin race? Titanium wrist pins? Lots of possibilities. I wonder if they'll ever take the wraps off.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Saturday, June 11, 2011 7:02 AM
It's probably not exotic, just a longer rod.
Ockham
Ockhamlink
Saturday, June 11, 2011 12:14 PM
You're probably right, but then why would they hide it? You can basically tell they're using a longer rod thanks to the raised wrist pin centerline, and infer the same from the increased rev limit.
Jasonrg77
Jasonrg77link
Saturday, June 11, 2011 5:22 PM
In the suspension are those two springs (spring and helper) or one progressive rate spring?
Ockham
Ockhamlink
Sunday, June 12, 2011 5:02 AM
@Jasonrg77: Those are two springs. They're held concentric with a machined aluminum coupler. Standard fare for KW's higher-end coilovers. Effectively, the combination gives a progressive-rate spring (note how the lighter spring has a rectangular profile so it's stable when fully compressed), but since it's split into two, you can tune both the higher and lower rate without making a new spring for each combination.
Rockwood
Rockwoodlink
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 9:46 AM
@ Jeff: First, KMA!

No BOV? Esplain:

"You can see the integral blow off valve on the compressor housing here. You can also see the built in boost control solenoid here as well next to the blow off valve. Such simplicity!"

Ugh at that turbo/wastegate merge though. Can't even put a divider wall in there. That can't be good for exhaust flow...
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 12:13 PM
There is a divider in the housing and a diffuser as well.
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 12:14 PM
The bov is built into the compressor housing.
Der Bruce
Der Brucelink
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 12:59 PM
Perhaps I should have worded this better, but how did they fit the tranny in there and keep things FD legal?

I could only suppose they used the exhaust tunnel for the driveline without having to fab an all new tunnel. I'm trying to better understand the statement concerning the conversion "It is something not outside the realm of what any motorsports fabricator could quickly accomplish".

PS Not trying to start anything, extremely fascinated by these. I think had somebody been converting TCs to RWD outside FD, I probably would've considered buying one. Project Scion TC would be getting loads of traffic if it was Project RWD Scion TC!
Mike Kojima
Mike Kojimalink
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 1:56 PM
You can enlarge the tranny tunnel, the size that you can enlarge the firewall opening is limited but allowed.
Der Bruce
Der Brucelink
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 5:36 PM
It's kind of funny how they allow just enough so the Scions can run ;)

Do you think FD will outlaw them once the FRS is available or teams will just drop them with how much cheaper the FRS would be to develop?

I was reading about the latest in Japanese drifting the other day and they called the 2JZ their new "small block". Can you believe that, the 2JZ over a VQ? People want a "small block" after seeing what Dai's doing with his!
SWR
SWRlink
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 11:25 PM
I can easily understand why they are going with the 2JZ...
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