Latest Articles

How to Install Coilovers - KW Clubsports - Track Life Episode 3

by GTChannel 

Rob demonstrates how to install a set of Clubsport Coilovers from KW Suspension on the GTChannel S2000.


 

Project Lexus SC300 Road Racer: Part 1 - Intro and Fuel Cell

by Erik Jacobs

This is Damnit. All of my cars have nicknames, but this one earned its name long before I ever picked it up. I could write a book about everything that’s either been wrong or has gone wrong during the previous phases of this build. That being said, this is my first “real” race car. I intend to use Damnit targeting NASA Pro Racing’s ST2 class. Super Touring is a power-to-weight class with fairly open rules. Pretty much as long as you don’t move suspension pick-up points you can do a lot of things. ST2 is limited to 8.0:1 (lbs per horsepower) which, with a ~3200lb SC300 limits me to ~400WHP. Power, engine and other info will come in subsequent articles. Today, we're prepping to install a fuel cell.


 

Project Autocross BRZ: More Nameless Art

by Bart Hockerman

We all know when Nameless Performance has an idea on how to increase the performance further on their designs they will put into motion a plan of attack and some awesome fab work. They are pretty much the most aggressive company I have come across in my years of dealing with manufacturers across the spectrum. Improving upon their design is one thing they are allowed to do when building parts per your order. You the customer get the most current fabrication of the latest, greatest part they can make at that time.


 

Sneak Peek: The Indy Cars of Team Lotus

by David Zipf

We've shown you lot and lots of brand new IndyCars lately, but what did the racing world look like 50 years ago?  Lotus decided to enter the 500 in 1963 and they did so in their own unique style.  We got a chance to look at some of the cars that not only turned Indianapolis upside down in the 1960s, but helped cement Jim Clark as one of the most talented and legendary drivers to have ever lived.


 

Evaluating the HKS Max GT R35 GT-R Coilover Suspension System

by Mike Kojima

Not so long ago we evaluated HKS's new Max ST coil over suspension system on a Honda AP2 S2000.  The S2000 is a pretty decent handling car from the factory that is pretty suspension sensitive, the AP1 in particular has a lot of toe change with suspension moment and some wonky suspension can make it quite a handful.  

For our next evaluation we decided to try the other HKS coilover in the lineup the Max GT damper. While the Max ST is calibrated for the serious driver being set up like a hard core street and or weekend warrior track day shock, the GT is made for a mildly performance oriented driver that wants to lower their vehicle with a decent ride and have handling that is a step up from stock but with little sacrificed in the way of ride comfort.


 

Project Professional Awesome Time Attack Evo: Part 3 - Fuel System

by Daniel O'Donnell

At Professional Awesome Racing, we take pride in thinking through problems and coming up with solutions that are as efficient and reliable as possible, all while fitting into a modest budget. We try not to do things that other people do just because “it’s always been done that way.” As you can read in our previous articles, this has lead to unique designs with our chassis/roll cage and powerplant. We like to think this same mentality translates into our fuel and computer systems and that’s the topic we’ll dive into today. So enjoy reading while sitting on your favorite throne or perhaps fire up MotoIQ at work with a finger quick to pop up a spreadsheet if the boss walks by.


 

Demystifying the Camshaft: Part 1 - Valve Events

by Jonathan Spiegel

As we all know, the key to making power is to create pressure in the combustion chamber - and to create that pressure at the right time. This pressure works to drive the piston down in the cylinder and cause the crankshaft to rotate. The more air/fuel mixture you can get into the combustion chamber, the greater your potential for creating more pressure, and more power.


 

Extreme Engine Tech: Building a BMW S52 - Part 2: The Cylinder Head

by Nick Betz

If the engine as a whole is the heart of a car the cylinder head would be all the supporting parts that make the heart pump. Without the opening and closing of certain valves of the heart you can’t get blood to flow into the atriums and out the ventricles. Just like the heart, a cylinder head has multiple valves that need to open and close at specific times to get air in to and exhaust out of the combustion chambers to keep the engine pumping.  


 

PZ Tuning's 660WHP Awesome Civic

by Frank Ewald

There is nothing like seeing a race car in action. Even more, there is nothing like watching a race car move from a bare shell into a Global Time Attack Unlimited Front Wheel Drive class winning race car. William and Noreen Au-Yeung welcomed me into their store, Point Zero Audio and PZ Tuning, then opened the shop doors so that I could follow along on the build of this Honda Civic.


 

Extreme Engine Tech: Building the Ultimate K24 Part 3 - The Finished Goods!

by Mike Kojima

We have been working with Motovicity for the last few weeks to demonstrate the building of a potent Honda K24Z7 motor, built completely from in stock and off the shelf parts available from Motovicity themselves. We chose the K24Z7 as it is currently the OEM engine for the Civic Si and is relatively difficult to modify due to it's emissions bound cylinder head.  Our goal is not to build a dyno queen or a drag motor but to build a strong K motor all from off the shelf parts with the intention of getting the most power possible on pump gas with the widest most useable powerband. 

In the last two editions of our series we focused on the cylinder head and bottom end of our K24Z7. We swapped to an earlier model K20Z3 head  to get Vtec on the exhaust side and and removable exhaust manifold and installed Skunk2 camshafts, Kelford valvesprings and Supertech valves better suited for turbocharged use. For the bottom end we added lower compression JE pistons and stronger K1 rods, removing the problematic balance shafts while we were in there.  

Now it's time to finish off our motor. 


 

Nerd's Eye View: Mazdaspeed Mazda 767B

by M-P Spierer

The Mazda 767B is the third of four IMSA GTP predecessors to the iconic 787B that took the overall race win at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1991. The 767B was first raced in 1989 and is widely considered a success due to its reliability and for the part it played in progressing Mazda to the top of the podium in '91. This heritage is important because the 787B marked the first and only overall Le Mans win thus far from a Japanese manufacturer. It is also the first and only overall win using a rotary engine. So let's celebrate that heritage and take a closer look at some cutting edge 1980's technology.


 

Project Autocross BRZ: Swapping The Feal 441's to KW V3's

by Bart Hockerman

Since the first installment some time ago things have changed with the BRZ. KW has graciously supplied us with KW V3’s for use on this Project BRZ. With that in mind the 2014 SCCA Spring Nationals was the last event for us on the Feal 441’s. So we went out and gave them the last “Hoorah”. We brought home a solid 2nd and 4th place finish at the ProSolo and another solid 2nd place finish for the National Tour.


 

Event Coverage: ChumpCar at the Glen

by Frank Ewald

Is there anything better than spending a weekend at Watkins Glen?  How about spending the weekend at the Glen tracking your car? Maybe, tracking your car in an endurance race! How about three days of racing? 18 hours in total to push your team and your car to the limit. Top that off by getting on the podium twice - it certainly is nice. Even better, having a car running well is absolutely the highlight! To make it even better than that, telling yourself that you cannot attend and then getting a last minute call to drive a fast car at the full track in Optima Batteries ChumpCar World Series Memorial Day weekend event at WGI. Four hours Friday. Eight hours Saturday. Six hours Sunday. What a great weekend!


 

Sneak Peek: The Powertrains of the 2015 Le Mans LMP1 Class

by Khiem Dinh

One of the biggest knocks against Formula 1 and Indycar is the lack of diversity in the powertrains. The rules are extremely restrictive which means all the teams use the same basic formula for their powertrains. Formula 1 uses 1.6L, 6-cylinder, gasoline direct-injection turbocharged engines with MGU-K and MGU-H energy recovery devices with batteries being the storage medium. There is a little room for creativity in the turbos, but that’s about it. All Indycars uses 2.2L V6 twin-turbo engines; i.e. boring. The engines used in Formula Drift have more variety than Formula1 and Indycar combined. Now, enter the World Endurance Challenge where there are only a few basic rules resulting in the most impressive and widest range of powertrain technologies in one race series.


 

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